California is going to sh*t!

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I love my state, but it's really breaking my heart to see what it's turning into. Once upon a time, people used to move here for all the opportunity. Now people are starting to flee this place like a sinking ship. Small businesses can't stay afloat due to all of the new ridiculous laws on top of all of the taxes, fees, permits, licenses that are required.
A good friend of mine had a dream of owning his own salon, so after running a successful barbershop for a while and with so many of his female friends saying how much they wish he had a salon, he finally took the plunge and opened up a salon. It was doing pretty good for a small business, then California passed a law making it illegal for hairdressers to work on commission. Then the next month, a law was passed making it illegal to rent out hair stations. It's illegal to work as a hairdresser if you're not getting an hourly wage now, and the minimum hourly wage for hairdressers is $21.00 an hour. These laws caused him to lose his business.

I wanted to participate in the Alcatraz Invitational last month (it's an open water swim competition, swimming from Alcatraz to the mainland), but seeing how bad San Francisco has gotten, I decided not to go. For Christ's sake, there are people shooting up heroin in public, in broad daylight, and there's human feces all over the streets. It's so bad, that there is an app you can download onto your phone that tells you on a map where the poop is really bad so you can avoid it.

Has everyone gone crazy here??? How come it feels like no one else can see how fucked up this is? Maybe because everyone with enough sense to see it has moved the hell outta here. idk...
If we don't do something to turn this around soon, this place is going to turn into another Detroit.
 

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minimum hourly wage for hairdressers is $21.00 an hour.
Is there some law that makes them require a higher hourly wage than the state mandated hourly wage of $11/hour?
 
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I love my state, but it's really breaking my heart to see what it's turning into. Once upon a time, people used to move here for all the opportunity. Now people are starting to flee this place like a sinking ship. Small businesses can't stay afloat due to all of the new ridiculous laws on top of all of the taxes, fees, permits, licenses that are required.
A good friend of mine had a dream of owning his own salon, so after running a successful barbershop for a while and with so many of his female friends saying how much they wish he had a salon, he finally took the plunge and opened up a salon. It was doing pretty good for a small business, then California passed a law making it illegal for hairdressers to work on commission. Then the next month, a law was passed making it illegal to rent out hair stations. It's illegal to work as a hairdresser if you're not getting an hourly wage now, and the minimum hourly wage for hairdressers is $21.00 an hour. These laws caused him to lose his business.

I wanted to participate in the Alcatraz Invitational last month (it's an open water swim competition, swimming from Alcatraz to the mainland), but seeing how bad San Francisco has gotten, I decided not to go. For Christ's sake, there are people shooting up heroin in public, in broad daylight, and there's human feces all over the streets. It's so bad, that there is an app you can download onto your phone that tells you on a map where the poop is really bad so you can avoid it.

Has everyone gone crazy here??? How come it feels like no one else can see how fucked up this is? Maybe because everyone with enough sense to see it has moved the hell outta here. idk...
If we don't do something to turn this around soon, this place is going to turn into another Detroit.
Yep, CA has really been pushing people out like crazy because of laws, taxes and cost of living. Everyone talks about wanting "free" education, "free" health insurance, and other "free" things the Gov't provides. Problem is that it isn't free. The Gov't has to raise taxes to pay for those things, which is what people never think about.

Beyond that, when borders are removed and there's no control on how many people are allowed into the country, it puts a heavy burden on the social welfare system so the Gov't is forced to ever increase taxes to pay for it all. Given CA is a sanctuary state, and they want to provide benefits to anyone and everyone, they have no choice but to raise taxes. What they fail to see is the cause of problem, they only think the solution is to force higher wages.

Sadly, while CA is the leader in a lot of this, many states are following suit.

That being said, while I no longer live in CA, it will always be home of some sort.
 
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Is there some law that makes them require a higher hourly wage than the state mandated hourly wage of $11/hour?
Here's an article that talks about it some

https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/california-salon-employee-commission-pay.aspx


new addition to California law changes the definition of commission pay for licensed employees of beauty salons and barber shops. Under the new law, certain common arrangements, such as agreements to pay stylists on a commission-only basis or on a minimum wage plus commissions basis, are no longer considered to be commission-based pay.

S.B. 490 adds Section 204.11 to the California Labor Code. In short, the new law specifies that wages paid to employees who are licensed and paid to provide services pursuant to the Barbering and Cosmetology Act qualify as commissions (either as a percentage or a flat rate) only if the following requirements are met:

  • The employee's base hourly rate is at least two times the state minimum wage in addition to commissions paid.
  • The employee's wages are paid at least twice during each calendar month on days designated in advance by the employer as regular paydays.
Thus, with the state minimum wage at $10.50, a stylist would have to be paid a base hourly rate of at least $21.00 in order for incentive pay to qualify as "commissions." This rate will increase as the state's minimum wage rate increases each year. Further, employers must pay this hourly rate of pay for all compensable hours worked, including the stylists' nonproductive time, rest breaks, and recovery breaks.

Salons are not required to pay employees in this manner. However, if the above two criteria are not met, then the incentive pay does not qualify as "commissions" and it may instead be deemed "piece rate" compensation subject to the requirements of California Labor Code Section 226.2

Piece rate pay in California can be complicated due to special requirements relating to payment for rest breaks, nonproductive time and overtime, as well as cumbersome requirements relating to data displayed on pay stubs.

Piece rate pay also comes with its own troubles unique to the beauty salon industry, since stylists often sell products or services while also performing services. This creates issues with accurately calculating working hours and payment. In addition, piece-rate compensation has numerous other requirements, which may make it an unattractive option to many businesses.

Alternatively, stylists can simply be paid a flat hourly rate with no incentive pay. (Note that this would not change the requirement to pay employees for nonproductive time, rest breaks, and recovery breaks at the employee's hourly rate.)

As a result of the new law, some salon owners may contemplate traditional booth rental arrangements. However, such arrangements, if not properly implemented, may lead to litigation arising out of the potential misclassification of stylists as independent contractors.

For salons that do elect to pay commissions to their employees, it is imperative to have written commission agreements in place that are in conformity with all applicable laws.
 
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Here's an article that talks about it some

https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/legal-and-compliance/state-and-local-updates/pages/california-salon-employee-commission-pay.aspx


new addition to California law changes the definition of commission pay for licensed employees of beauty salons and barber shops. Under the new law, certain common arrangements, such as agreements to pay stylists on a commission-only basis or on a minimum wage plus commissions basis, are no longer considered to be commission-based pay.

S.B. 490 adds Section 204.11 to the California Labor Code. In short, the new law specifies that wages paid to employees who are licensed and paid to provide services pursuant to the Barbering and Cosmetology Act qualify as commissions (either as a percentage or a flat rate) only if the following requirements are met:




    • The employee's base hourly rate is at least two times the state minimum wage in addition to commissions paid.
    • The employee's wages are paid at least twice during each calendar month on days designated in advance by the employer as regular paydays.
Thus, with the state minimum wage at $10.50, a stylist would have to be paid a base hourly rate of at least $21.00 in order for incentive pay to qualify as "commissions." This rate will increase as the state's minimum wage rate increases each year. Further, employers must pay this hourly rate of pay for all compensable hours worked, including the stylists' nonproductive time, rest breaks, and recovery breaks.

Salons are not required to pay employees in this manner. However, if the above two criteria are not met, then the incentive pay does not qualify as "commissions" and it may instead be deemed "piece rate" compensation subject to the requirements of California Labor Code Section 226.2

Piece rate pay in California can be complicated due to special requirements relating to payment for rest breaks, nonproductive time and overtime, as well as cumbersome requirements relating to data displayed on pay stubs.

Piece rate pay also comes with its own troubles unique to the beauty salon industry, since stylists often sell products or services while also performing services. This creates issues with accurately calculating working hours and payment. In addition, piece-rate compensation has numerous other requirements, which may make it an unattractive option to many businesses.

Alternatively, stylists can simply be paid a flat hourly rate with no incentive pay. (Note that this would not change the requirement to pay employees for nonproductive time, rest breaks, and recovery breaks at the employee's hourly rate.)

As a result of the new law, some salon owners may contemplate traditional booth rental arrangements. However, such arrangements, if not properly implemented, may lead to litigation arising out of the potential misclassification of stylists as independent contractors.

For salons that do elect to pay commissions to their employees, it is imperative to have written commission agreements in place that are in conformity with all applicable laws.
Just glancing over it, almost sounds like salon stylists will be compensated in the same way as wait staff at restaurants: if employees do not get at least $xamount from commissions, employers are required to compensate in the amount to equal at least $21 per hour.

It's late and I've been on the computer too long and had some rum'n'cokes so I may have glossed over most of that article, but am I far off?
 
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Just glancing over it, almost sounds like salon stylists will be compensated in the same way as wait staff at restaurants: if employees do not get at least $xamount from commissions, employers are required to compensate in the amount to equal at least $21 per hour.

It's late and I've been on the computer too long and had some rum'n'cokes so I may have glossed over most of that article, but am I far off?
The problem is they removed the ability for stylist to be subcontractors renting out stalls. Then after forcing them into being employees further disrupted the traditional system adding minimum wage to employee who shouldn't been employees to begin with.
 

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The problem is they removed the ability for stylist to be subcontractors renting out stalls. Then after forcing them into being employees further disrupted the traditional system adding minimum wage to employee who shouldn't been employees to begin with.
So again it sounds like CA is trying to turn salon stylists into waitresses.
 
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I’m wondering what prompted this piece of legislation. What problem were they trying to “fix” and who was lobbying for it?
Probably unreported earnings, and tax evasion. Being that stylists and wait staff income has the potential to be primarily from cash tips, it can be very easy to not report full earnings. My ex-wife was a stylist, and the state we are in did something similar.
 
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If you own a salon and the people working there aren't pulling in $20 an hour of their own merit, something is wrong with your business plan. I'm not sure why they would take away a cosmetologist's right to subcontract at their own loss. California already has really high requirements for cosmetology training. It seems like some states are trying to get rid of careers that allow people to make bank without traditional college. Or against jobs that make a decent amount through tips? Sad as both of those are equalizers financially. Still, I'd think this would hurt individual hairdressers who aren't talented enough to do consistently well enough with commissions more than a salon owner except that if they're employing people they also have to supply product.
 

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Yep, CA has really been pushing people out like crazy because of laws, taxes and cost of living. Everyone talks about wanting "free" education, "free" health insurance, and other "free" things the Gov't provides. Problem is that it isn't free. The Gov't has to raise taxes to pay for those things, which is what people never think about.

Beyond that, when borders are removed and there's no control on how many people are allowed into the country, it puts a heavy burden on the social welfare system so the Gov't is forced to ever increase taxes to pay for it all. Given CA is a sanctuary state, and they want to provide benefits to anyone and everyone, they have no choice but to raise taxes. What they fail to see is the cause of problem, they only think the solution is to force higher wages.

Sadly, while CA is the leader in a lot of this, many states are following suit.

That being said, while I no longer live in CA, it will always be home of some sort.
If they want everything for "FREE" why do they expect to be "PAID" for "FREE" stuff , if it's "FREE" there should be no monetary amount attached to the accomplishment of the action.
Professors and School Teachers shouldn't get government funds for "FREE" education.
Nurses and Doctors shouldn't get government funds for "FREE" healthcare.
Politicians shouldn't get government funds for doing nothing for the citizens they supposedly represent.(let their puppetmasters compensate them.
If it's "FREE" then there should be no "TAXES" on it either.
 
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I love my state, but it's really breaking my heart to see what it's turning into. Once upon a time, people used to move here for all the opportunity. Now people are starting to flee this place like a sinking ship. Small businesses can't stay afloat due to all of the new ridiculous laws on top of all of the taxes, fees, permits, licenses that are required.
Wages haven't gone up in 30 years. People are making some thing like 20% then they would have 30 years ago. Programming jobs are one of the few exceptions. Which has really exacerbates the income gap in the bay area. :(
 
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I wanted to participate in the Alcatraz Invitational last month (it's an open water swim competition, swimming from Alcatraz to the mainland), but seeing how bad San Francisco has gotten, I decided not to go. For Christ's sake, there are people shooting up heroin in public, in broad daylight, and there's human feces all over the streets. It's so bad, that there is an app you can download onto your phone that tells you on a map where the poop is really bad so you can avoid it.
Couldn't help but laugh at this. Sounds terrible. I don't know if even Detroit is that bad.