DSLR Camera settings for videos?

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Feb 5, 2017
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i bought a gently USED DSLR camera(Nikon D5500).i was wondering what setting to use to make videos looks better. i know its a little old but it has a hard time focusing and exposure doesn't seem right for indoor videos.any help or tutorials to follow to improve the quality?
 

paige_orion

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What is your current lighting setup? I know it may sound super obvious, but I have found that my cameras often have trouble focusing if my room is too dark. It's all just shadows and blah, which means I end up with blurry images and a TON of noise, which also seems to degrade the quality of the footage. Investing in my lighting and learning how to utilize the lighting properly was the best thing I did to improve my clip quality, both for DSLR and camcorders alike!

Also, learning how to properly white-balance my shots saved me a LOOOOOT of time in the later editing stages!
 
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Shutterbuck

AdultIndieProductions.com
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Can you provide more info on your settings?
24p? 30p? 60?
Manual or auto settings?
 

Shutterbuck

AdultIndieProductions.com
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Start here.
I know 60p is super popular, especially with the gaming/streaming crowd. But 24p (even 30) will give you much more wiggle room in ISO and aperture. Crop frame cameras like yours will always produce more “noise” at pushed ISO’s and slowing down that frame rate will help reduce the noise as well as increase exposure.
And yes. Auto settings will produce jarring changes in exposure as your camera will adjust iso and or aperture to compensate for changing lighting conditions and there are no smooth transitions between each stop.